Ar. Shobhan Kothari - ADND

Ar. Shobhan Kothari - ADND
Homes will now begin to address not only the pragmatic aspect of design but also question the ‘wellness’ quotient in design.
Designs will evolve from having ‘curb-appeal’ to a more socially contributing device. Homegrown compost from waste to manure for plants, design with less frills and show, and home office to accommodate a healthy home-work balance life will be needed. Spaces in general will have to be designed for duplicity or multiplicity of functions, rather than serving a singular purpose. Materials that are sustainable and environmentally safe will be used more in coming times.

Minimalism by the process of filtration and not as a reductive process will be the next move.
Anything that we do not want will be removed. As designers, we will need to build homes with fresh air circulation and natural light. The designs will need to cater to bringing harmony with nature as much as possible. Technology and data are going to be the front runners in designing spaces of the future. The AI-driven home is not a novel concept; it has already found a niche audience; and the future will see AI permeate all homes.

ADND

Policymakers, developers, designers, and all society-conscious stakeholders will have to put their heads together to create not a ‘new normal’ but a more ‘stable and sustainable normal’.
We need to understand that the industry was always under duress before the pandemic. The event has only highlighted its problems. We need to create jobs in cities to prevent large influx of migrants, create designs that go beyond the threshold of aesthetics and are more human-centric, and create cities where the housing sector caters to all the working classes.

ADND

This pandemic has made us all question the future. Architecture and its future will also be challenged. Solutions will need to be immediate, absorbing the ‘new normal’ and also developing a long term perspective for a more resilient future. The real estate industry has mainly three pain points to factor in, namely, Financial strains (both due to government policies and the banking sector); Labour, and Demand (both from the intrinsic market as well as the NRI segment).

Ar. Sumit Dhawan, Cityspace’82 Architects

Building materials play a prominent role in the technical aspects of a built form, including factors like insulation, acoustics, etc. Building material selection is as important as the form development process in order to improve the quality of the built form Read More ...

Ar. Nilanjan Bhowal, Design Consortium India

We have reached a point where architects and engineers are planning for the entire life cycle of a building: from conception to demolition, providing alternatives at every step of the way to reduce harm to the environment during the entire process Read More ...

Ar. Manish Kumat Manish, Kumat Design Cell

A series of modular walls, breathable walls, and porous osmosis walls to ensure a controlled transfer of moisture and odour in the air, use of materials such as reclaimed wood, cork, AAC blocks, energy-efficient lighting fixtures, double glazed windows and automation Read More ...

Rohit Suraj, Founder & CEO, Urban Zen

Material selection is a crucial part of the design process and also depends on the client’s likes and expectations to a large extent. While choosing a material to work with, its intrinsic physical characteristics and experiential qualities are always the best parameters Read More ...

Ar. Harish Tripathi, Arhta

The role of local materials and technology cannot be undermined and their acceptability at the government and public level can create appropriate solutions. Amidst the mass movement and decline in trade as repercussions of the pandemic, the importance of using local Read More ...

Ar. Sandeep Joshi, Artisan

The trend is moving towards stronger materials that can better withstand the test of time, natural disasters, and give back to the environment instead of taking away from it. As the supply of natural resources becomes scarcer, we will be forced to use renewable and recyclable Read More ...

The Value of Material Choices

Context, functionality, and aesthetics play a crucial role in architecture with one of the most influential aspects being the value of material choices. For most buildings, the key features defining their ‘iconicity’ can be summarized as strong concept design, relevant Read More ...

Ar. Akshat Bhatt - Architecture Discipline

The pandemic and the current human condition have become markers in our collective history as the forbearers of change –– of a push towards minimal resource consumption and sustainable living. Our homes today have re-emerged as sanctuaries –– places of safe and ‘socially-distanced’ Read More ...

Ar. Aahana Miller - ABM Architects

There needs to be a change in the mindset of designers who must do away with fussy detailing and specify materials that would show dirt and be easy to clean. Homeowners are looking for alternate homes and homes away from the cities. They also want fabrics and materials Read More ...

Ar. Dinesh Verma & Ar. Akshara Verma - ACE Group Architects

In the name of development, we have overdone, over-consumed, and overlooked nature, and instead of being friendly, have turned hostile towards it. Society has knowingly compromised on the average area required by a person to be naturally comfortable, in the name of ‘expensive real estate’ Read More ...

Ar. Harish Tripathi & Jyoti D Tripathi - Arhta

Post pandemic, our perception and usage of space has changed drastically. Planning parameters and appropriate environments for habitat have gained a lot of importance. As people were confined to their homes, they began to actively appreciate the necessity of having appropriateness Read More ...

Ar. Aquin Noel - Aquin Noel Design Commune

Creating buildings that permit adaptive reuse would be notable changes. The idea of touch and feel might slowly transform into do not touch; however, I strongly believe that architecture should be appreciated by touch and feel. Technological advancements shall soon bring Read More ...

Ar. Sandeep Joshi - Artisan

The next few years will see a renewed interest in using design and architecture as social, political, and economic tools. In the aftermath of the pandemic, we should expect to see buildings becoming more sustainable and energy-efficient. They will also need to be designed with pandemic Read More ...

Ar. Arpan Johari - AW Design

Closed and conditioned spaces and buildings that have international movement like airports, will have to be completely thought of in a new light. Humans are adaptive species; lessons learnt from the pandemic would certainly lead to changes in the built environment. For starters Read More ...

Ar. Biswabhushan Beura - Bentel Associates

Retail architecture will cater more consciously to general well-being and actively focus on curating unique spatial experiences. Due to the pandemic, an important shift in architecture will be that large-scale public buildings will be remarkably well-ventilated and spacious Read More ...

Prof. Charanjit S. Shah - Creative Group

We need to focus more on natural resource management to create healthy environments. The pandemic has taught us the real values of nature and our natural resources. It has taught us that we need to be minimalistic in our design approach and create human settlements wherein we live Read More ...